Crinolines & Petticoats

Crinolines & Petticoats

Mermaid Slip
Mermaid Slip
  Here are examples of most of our
Crinolines & Petticoats available to rent.
We recommend that you bring your
dress when you are ready to choose
your undergarments.  With a broad
selection of styles for Crinolines &
Petticoats we are sure to be able to
meet your specific need.  We are here
to help you achieve your perfect look
with the correct choice of
Crinolines & Petticoats. 

2 Bone Hoop Slip
2 Bone Hoop Slip

3 Bone Hoop Slip
3 Bone Hoop Slip

Ruffled 3 Bone Hoop
Ruffled 3 Bone Hoop

4 Bone Hoop Slip
4 Bone Hoop Slip

Draw String Aline Crinoline Slip
Draw String Aline Crinoline Slip

883 Draw String Double Ruffle Crinoline Slip
883 Draw String Double Ruffle Crinoline Slip
41-C7 Traditional Drawstring Bridal Slip

 Draw String Triple Ruffle Crinoline
Draw String Triple Ruffle Crinoline

Quince Slip - The fullest crinoline
Quince Slip – The fullest crinoline ($50.00 to rent due to cleaning costs)

Tons Of Tulle Drawstring Crinoline
Tons Of Tulle Drawstring Crinoline ($50.00 to rent due to cleaning costs)

Tea Length Draw String Crinoline
Tea Length Draw String Crinoline Slip

Childs Soft Nylon 2 Slip
Childs Soft Nylon 2 Slip (for sale only) Sizes: S (13 Inch), M (16 inch), L (19 inch), XL (22 inch)

It might help if you understand the historical order of the use of the word.
Crinoline was originally a material used to make petticoats in the 1840s to increase the width of the skirt without endless undergarments. It was made of horsehair and linen and didn’t crush easily under its own weight. These were called crinoline petticoats, identifying the material and purpose of the garment. Eventually, they just became referred to as “crinolines.”

With the introduction of the hoop skirt in the mid 1850s, crinolines were displaced by hoop skirts, but the term transferred from one to the other. Any skirt undergarment that created fullness came to be known as a crinoline. Essentially the large crinolines fell from fashion in the 1870s, as did the term, and we heard nothing about crinolines again.

Then, in the late 1940s, those full multi-skirted and flounced nylon tulle and taffeta, or gathered and flounced nylon tricot petticoats intended for creating fullness in skirts came into use once again.

Wedding, and some evening gowns also employed feather-bone stiffened petticoats, or hoop skirts, all of which became known as crinolines, so essentially, the material had nothing to do with the purpose of the garment or the term anymore, and the undergarment alone became known as a “crinoline”.

The nylon netting, or tulle, or any material used to make a crinoline after 1855 is not referred to as crinoline – it is the garment itself that is known by that name.

Written by Leila Hidic, corsetsandcrinolines.com and Jonathan Walford, kickshawproductions